Share This:
Previous Post
Next Post
  • Codpiece

    Photo:  DC Comics

    In a classic bit of good, old comic book one-and-done madness, the penile villain known as Codpiece was introduced in 1993’s Doom Patrol #70 and has never been seen again. After years and years of dealing with an inferiority complex stemming from, well, his smaller-than-average phallus, Codpiece engineers a supersuit of sorts centered around a large, metal… jockstrap.

    Indeed, a man seemingly belittled for his minute member is so undone by this, he creates a phallic suit to help him hold up banks and get back at a society that shunned him. By the end of the issue, the Doom Patrol has melted his metal manhood, and he has never been heard from since. Let the record show: Sticks and stones may break your bones, but words can break your psyche.

  • The Matador

    Photo:  Marvel Comics

    Manuel Eloganto, AKA the Matador, was introduced in 1964’s Daredevil #5, which happens to have one of the funniest comic book covers of all time. Without the knowledge that a costume party is taking place, readers see Daredevil – in his original black-and-yellow costume, no less – seemingly bested by the Matador with people of various historical dress circled around them. It’s a peculiar image that could only realistically exist in a comic book.

    As for Eloganto, he becomes a villain after the crowd jeers at him during one of his bullfighting exhibitions, distracting the performer from the bull rushing his way. Eloganto is hit by the bull and rushed to the hospital, where emergency surgery saves his life. At that point, he blames his injuries on “his fellow man” and vows “revenge upon all mankind!” Seems like a real stable guy with a good head on his shoulders.

  • Star

    Photo:  Marvel Comics

    Introduced in the pages of 2019’s Captain Marvel series spearheaded by writer Kelly Thompson, Ripley Ryan was a reporter who ended up captured and antagonized by Nuclear Man before Captain Marvel and a host of other heroes managed to save her and the forcibly held civilians. Feeling powerless in this terrible situation, Ryan sensibly wants to prepare herself for any other calamities that could come her way – it’s just her turn to villainy that is disappointing.

    After making a deal with Minn-Erva to grant her superpowers, Ryan – now going by the name Star – would not only siphon the life energy of Captain Marvel, but attempt to siphon that energy from the millions of people living in New York City. Upon being asked by Captain Marvel why she would harm so many people in Captain Marvel #11, Star replies, “…they can never reach their full potential with you ‘saving’ them at every turn. With me to show them the path, there will be no more victims, just survivors.” Star was defeated, but she is now starring in her own self-titled miniseries in which she possesses the Reality Stone, so it’s clear she’s not just a one-and-done kind of villain.

  • Mister Mxyzptlk

    Photo:  DC Comics

    Even in the realm of comic books, Mister Mxyzptlk stands out as one of the oddest characters around. Much like Bullseye, but at a vastly more powerful and cosmic level, Mxyzptlk messes around with Superman because he’s merely bored and can do almost anything with his magical powerset.

    Mister Mxyzptlk is a near-omnipotent, magical imp from the Fifth Dimemsion, and he just loves stirring up trouble for the Man of Tomorrow in the form of cartoonish, childlike pranks and challenges. For example, in 1990’s Adventures of Superman #463, Mister Mxyzptlk forces Superman and the Flash into a footrace with the fate of the Earth dangling in the balance. Why, you ask? Well… why not?

  • Hush

    Photo:  DC Comics

    In the pantheon of Batman villains, Thomas Elliot (AKA Hush) has failed to make as much impact as household names like the Joker and Catwoman, but he has been an enduring antagonist since his introduction in the well-received 2002/2003 Batman storyline “Batman: Hush,” by Jeph Loeb and Jim Lee. Elliot was the childhood friend of Bruce Wayne, and his ludicrous heel-turn to evil came at a young age.

    A hyperintelligent boy, Elliot tried to engineer the seemingly accidental demise of his parents at age 10 in order to take over their vast fortune. He ultimately succeeded in offing his father, but his mother survived via a life-saving surgery from Dr. Thomas Wayne. Hence his lifelong hatred of the Wayne family. Things would only spiral from there, but it was his adolescent need for a family fortune that began his descent into the wrong side of the law.

  • Bullseye

    Photo:  Marvel Comics

    Bullseye is the kind of insane villain comic book readers love to root against; the guy is directly involved in one of the most iconic comic book panels of all time. He’s a master assassin with the ability to make anything he can throw into a deadly device, something that’s both undeniably cool and extremely stupid. But how did Bullseye get into the slaying game? He was bored, of course.

    Bullseye: Greatest Hits #2 (2004) gives the story of how the Daredevil supervillain got into Major League Baseball and ended up quitting after three games due to boredom. How, exactly, did he tender his resignation? By beaming a fastball at the batter, instantly ending his life. What did he utter, smirking on the mound where he just terminated a man out of boredom? “Bullseye.”

  • The Collector

    Photo:  Marvel Comics

    Taneleer Tivan, AKA The Collector, is a member of the Elders of the Universe and one of the oldest living beings in the Marvel universe. Played by Benicio del Toro in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Tivan is ruled by one thing and one thing only: his obsession with collecting nearly everything he finds valuable across the cosmos.

    In 1978’s Avengers #174, Tivan gives his origins of sorts and claims the evil power of Thanos has spurred him into collecting a sampling of “specimens and curiosities” in order to preserve them from the wrath of the Mad Titan. Tivan has run afoul of everyone from Spider-Man and Wolverine to Howard the Duck and Deadpool – all in the name of preserving his precious collection.

  • The Riddler

    Photo:  DC Comics

    The Riddler, from pre-Crisis to post-Crisis, from The New 52 to DC Rebirth, is always obsessed with one thing and one thing only: proving that he’s smarter than not only Batman, but everyone on the face of the Earth. The guy just can’t get out of his own way. He gets caught after committing offenses he could’ve gotten away with merely because of his need to leave witty clues behind to demonstrate his intelligence.

    With the high degree of genius-level smarts he is lucky enough to have, he not only chooses a life of a crook but lives an unsuccessful life of a crook due to his incessant need to belittle those he finds less intelligent. Perhaps he isn’t all that bright after all?

  • Lex Luthor

    Photo:  DC Comics

    Thanks to actors like Gene Hackman, Michael Rosenbaum, and Jesse Eisenberg, Superman archnemesis Lex Luthor is one of the most well-known comic book antagonists around. And while it’s true that Luthor was a shady guy even before Superman came into his life, it is his undying obsession to best the Man of Steel that defines him.

    Year after year, comic book after comic book, Luthor does everything in his power to get one over on the Kryptonian wonder and yet, without fail, he always loses in the end. Much like Doctor Doom and his obsession with Reed Richards, if Luthor would only move on and focus his considerable talents elsewhere, it’s not hard to see him living a happier life. Alas, as sure as the sun rises in the east and sets in the west, Lex Luthor will always try to defeat Superman.

Previous Post
Next Post
Share This: